Wordless Wednesday: Bath Time

DSC_0248

DSC_0213

This young fellow has visited us a number of times. Great moment of early morning entertainment.

Advertisements

Badlands, Onions and an Ogre.

Our challenge this week is to find pictures that best illustrate something that is layered.

One of the first thing that came to my mind was a stack of pancakes smothered in syrup, or how about a mouth watering hamburger loaded with toppings. Unfortunately I could not come up with the appropriate pics, so I will have to bore you with these.

DSC_0131 (2)
A rolling stone gathers no moss, but in this case…………
DSC_0539
fungi to climb.
DSC_0614
Where I live you don’t need layers.
DSC_0937
Almost too many layers to count.

And who can argue with Shrek when he said, “Ogres are like onions……onions have many layers.” Who wants to dispute an ogre?
Layered

Texture all Around Us.

 

DSC_0575 (2)Texture is all around us, some pleasing, others painful to the touch. Some beautiful and intriguing, and some not so.

Texture is not just for the touch, but also the taste. It can make or break a culinary adventure. Sometimes texture can be appreciated by simply looking at it. It can appeal to the senses at a number of levels. Some objects just beg to be touched, but be careful and wise.

Textures

Living Statues of Puerto Vallarta. No. 12

With Semana Santa (Easter Celebrations) in full swing in Puerto Vallarta, the Malecon is full of vacationing Mexican families, and a diversity of the weird and wonderful sights that are always a part of the celebrations. For those who are willing to participate, there is a surprise at every turn, some very imagitive, some wild and scary .

My ventures there with Maggie over several days produced some very interesting encounters. Enjoy.

P1040385


P1040375


P1040396
P1040398
Surprise

Puerto Vallarta’s Architecture. No. 10

P1030900

P1040144

P1040143
La Iglesia De Nuestra Senora De Guadalupe, 1929.

The pictures above are just a small example .of the varied building styles to be found in and around PV. It is an eclectic mix of Hispanic and contemporary styles, helping to retain  the old world charm with that of current design. This can be seen in the Spanish influence on domes, courtyards and arches.

Construction today is designed to be earth quake smart and only sway and not crumble. Materials used are usually cement and steel, but some adobe materials can still be found in rural areas. These materials also act as a deterrent to termites of which a number of their nests can be seen in and around PV.

P1040158

P1040155

DSC_0929

P1040232
Teatro Causedo, 1922.
P1030973
The arch is a prominent feature in many structures

 

Malecon Sculptures in Puerto Vallarta. No. 9

One of the major attractions in Puerto Vallarta is the Malecon. Originally constructed in 1936 and called Paseo de la Revolucion, then changed to Paseo Diaz Ordaz, and later just El Malecon, which is Spanish for “Esplanade along a Waterfront”. It runs along the water front on Banderas Bay for about 2k, and on the town side, it sports many stores, restaurants amphitheatre, and bars.

The lower picture was taken in the 1930’s, The top one as it looks today.

malecon-1950s-vs-2013-s

One of the main draws along its route are the sculptures, many of them whimsical and all created by Mexican artists.

P1040180
Boy on the Seahorse, Caballito de Mar, by Rafael Zamarripa. 1976
P1040186
Roundabout of the Sea, “La Rotunda Del Mar, by Alejandro Colunga, 1996.

P1040209

Not too sure that this qualifies as a sculpture, but I couldn’t help not including it in my blog.

These creations are fun, and some of them allow interaction by sitting or climbing on them. This is just one example of the many attractions that are here in PV. Come on down, pay us a visit, we haven’t run out of sun yet. Cheers.