That Weathered Look.

While strolling around Puerto Vallarta in Mexico, it is easy to come across dwellings that have braved the elements over the decades. Most do better than others, but not if it is wood.

The preferred building materials here are steel and concrete. Wood is subject to the ravishes of wind, salt and insects, termites in particular. Come to think about it, some of the locals here look like they have had their fair share of battles with the environment. But that is a story for another blog.

These two pictures were taken last year while on our winter escape. I think they capture the essence of the photo challenge rather nicely.

Cheers.

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Weathered

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Everything Changes.

Nothing stays the same. Now that probably is a good thing, in most instances. There are some things that do not change for the better. But I do not want to go there today. Not in the mood to rant.

I love how nature can transform herself. It is a slow process that can take hundreds of years or even centuries. Our photo challenge this week is transformation. I hope what follows captures this process, in some small way.

Used to be a tree, did't you
Used to be a tree, didn’t you?
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Years of decay has played its part.
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These figures were sculpted from sand.
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This junco helps transform what is just a knarley branch to the perfect perch.

Transformation

Well Rounded.

I hate straight lines. They are boring, plain, uninteresting and over rated. They route you in one side of a scene or picture, and then  right out the other.

Just look at our buildings. For the most part they are boxes. And why; I suspect that in part it is dictated by custom, materials at hand and familiarity. And or possibly a lack of imagination.

Don’t get me wrong, straight has its place. It is just that it is highly overrated, overused and unimagetive.

The eye loves round. It softens a shape, it flows and allows the eye to dwell in one space. It can linger and rest there. It can reside in one spot and refuse to leave. Just gaze around you in Nature. Straight is highly outnumbered by well rounded lines. Take the time to observe and you will find it relaxing and rewarding.

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Close Encounters of the Third Kind was filmed in the area of this monolith.
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The eye follows around the frame and then centers on the dragon.

Look at these two top pics and notice how the eye automatically follows the curve of the water and the path. You are lead into the scene and wonder what lays around the bend.

When you look at these pics, the eye wants to dwell there and check out all the details. DSC_0637

DSC_0270Arches, domes, and many other curved structures of the past still abound today due to their strength, endurance, and design. Take a tour of Europe or Asia and many of these features will be evident. They will leave you in awe and wonderment as to their durability. Cheers.
Rounded

Day of the Dead, A Celebration of Life. No. 7

With our Halloween just around the corner, I thought it would be timely to repost this blog from last February.

LIFE AS I SEE IT - with one eye closed.

Many cultural rituals and “celebrations” are misunderstood and shunned by those who do not participate. I have to admit that I fell into that category. Being in Mexico for four months, and being exposed to many strange figures around town, I became curious and needed to know the story and origin of a three day happening ( Oct 31, Nov 1, 2) called The Day of the Dead or Dia de Muertos.


A little history is needed here.

Day of the Dead, called Día de Muertos in Spanish, is a Mexican holiday that falls on November 1 and 2 of each year. On the Day of the Dead, the boundaries between life and death begin to blur. Men, women and children of all ages honor and celebrate their loved ones who have passed away, participating joyously in a festival that has roots nearly 4000 years old. The holiday has spread in…

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Trademark,……really?

Here I go again. I am becoming addicted to limericks. Words and phrases keep popping into my head. If I am not careful, they could become my trademark. I am too weak to resist. They can be so delicious and tempting.

So, with that preamble in mind, here are two more to groan and giggle at.

A fine lady I know was a prancing,

Twirling and swirling and dancing.

The table I said,

Is not like your bed,

But in a pinch it’s great for romancing.

AND

Lady Nosebum read in circles most prudent,

Spewing mangled words she thought most fluent.

Was she smart and correct,

Cause no one could detect,

That she did enjoy a vowel movement.

Enough for  now. Till the next time.  Cheers.

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I need one of these after that!

Trademark

 

Glow, “glimmer, glimmer.”

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Still one of my favourite night shots. Taken on a quite street in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

When I first saw this word prompt for the photo challenge, I was transported back about 60 years to when my mother would play the tune, Glow-worm. First written for a German operetta in the early 20th century, translated to English by Lilla Cayley Robinson, and finally made popular by the Mills Brothers on an arrangement by Johnny Mercer in 1952.

Unable to find any glow worms, not even a fire fly, the best I could come up with follows.

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Moon glow in Tofino, British Columbia. Cheers.
Glow

Badlands, Onions and an Ogre.

Our challenge this week is to find pictures that best illustrate something that is layered.

One of the first thing that came to my mind was a stack of pancakes smothered in syrup, or how about a mouth watering hamburger loaded with toppings. Unfortunately I could not come up with the appropriate pics, so I will have to bore you with these.

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A rolling stone gathers no moss, but in this case…………
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fungi to climb.
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Where I live you don’t need layers.
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Almost too many layers to count.

And who can argue with Shrek when he said, “Ogres are like onions……onions have many layers.” Who wants to dispute an ogre?
Layered