Limerick Time, Again.

Our word for the day is witty. I hope this little ditty fits the bill.

A puffball from the old town of Blye

Blew into the town to say hi.

He bobbed and he pranced,

So when asked, why dance,

He replied that I am just a funguy.
Witty

img_0182

Advertisements

Badlands, Onions and an Ogre.

Our challenge this week is to find pictures that best illustrate something that is layered.

One of the first thing that came to my mind was a stack of pancakes smothered in syrup, or how about a mouth watering hamburger loaded with toppings. Unfortunately I could not come up with the appropriate pics, so I will have to bore you with these.

DSC_0131 (2)
A rolling stone gathers no moss, but in this case…………
DSC_0539
fungi to climb.
DSC_0614
Where I live you don’t need layers.
DSC_0937
Almost too many layers to count.

And who can argue with Shrek when he said, “Ogres are like onions……onions have many layers.” Who wants to dispute an ogre?
Layered

The Wait is over.

Something that has been on my mind for a while was to move to a new theme. Combine that with the photo challenge – waiting, being held over for another week, I decided to jump in.

Since I couldn’t lay my hands on appropriate “waiting pictures”, I decided to fall back to one of my favourite subjects, the limerick.

We are told that a limerick is a type of poem of 5 lines, and for the most part labelled anapestic.

Footnote: Anapestic is the term used to describe a metrical foot as it is used in poetry. It talks about stressed and unstressed syllables. All very important to those who care am sure. But for the purpose of this post, enough said.

The rhyme scheme is noted as AABBA. Seems it is required that they be humorous and possibly, if one is so bent, obscene.

To quote Wikipedia:The form appeared in England in the early years of the 18th century.[4] It was popularized by Edward Lear in the 19th century,[5] although he did not use the term. Gershon Legman, who compiled the largest and most scholarly anthology, held that the true limerick as a folk form is always obscene, and cites similar opinions by Arnold Bennett and George Bernard Shaw,[6] describing the clean limerick as a “periodic fad and object of magazine contests, rarely rising above mediocrity”. From a folkloric point of view, the form is essentially transgressive; violation of taboo is part of its function. Lear is unusual in his creative use of the form, satirising without overt violation.

So, with that in mind, it appears I have my instructions:

A limerick is such a fun ditty,

It lures one to be wicked and witty.

It leans to the naughty,

Never, ever too haughty,

As it explores and exposes all things gritty.

I was first smitten by the limerick after finding a book by Ogden Nash titled, The Face is Familiar, first published in 1931. After giggling my way through his words, I knew that I just had to give it a go.

The limerick form allows one to be unconventional and bend words to suit the need. Or to put it another way, just be silly and have fun.

Cheers.
waiting

Iphone pics, 2016 616
Waiting